“The Post” attempts high-stakes drama with history

Steven Spielberg’s “The Post” recalls a pivotal time in 1971 when Katherine Graham (Meryl Streep) invokes the First Amendment right to freedom of the press while publishing top secret government conspiracy papers in The Washington Post.  Despite threats of jail time and bankruptcy, Graham stands by her paper and the reporting.

While the First Amendment may be important here, it’s actually Graham’s role in history that strikes a weightier chord.  Unfortunately, the narrative doesn’t make the significance as apparent as it should.  It becomes necessary for Tony Bradlee (Sarah Paulson, wasted here) to spell it out.  Her job isn’t just to make it clear for her husband Ben (Tom Hanks) within the context of the movie, but for the audience as well.  And, if a movie can’t make its own point without utilizing a character for this purpose, then how successful has it really been?

“The Post” certainly attempts to create high-stakes drama and lays out the history well.  In fact, the film relies heavily on an alternating blue/yellow color palette to this end.  For more about “The Post” and how these colors are used specifically, take a look below:

 

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All photos courtesy of 20th Century Fox.

THE BFG Review & Analysis

Book-to-movie adaptations are tricky work.  What works in a book may not translate well to screen and that’s where Steven Spielberg‘s THE BFG stumbles.  Each individual element of the movie seems like it should work, from the two time Oscar winner production designer Rick Carter to last year’s Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Mark Rylance as the title character.  The music is beautiful as well.  However, bringing realistic-looking giants to life when they eat children is a tricky proposition since visuals like that take the movie squarely out of the “family friendly” camp.  THE BFG lacks the darker elements of the story, and that’s part of what makes it a bit dull.

The young girl who plays Sophie, Ruby Barnhill, doesn’t quite mesh with Mark Rylance‘s Big Friendly Giant.  Their cadence is different and at times they seem to talk at each other vs with each other.  The character of Sophie who worked well in the book comes off in the movie as a slightly unlikable know-it-all.

For an in-depth analysis of the themes in THE BFG, take a look below:

–>Direct link to the video footage: https://youtu.be/0y4PmIcNUGA

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